Beyonce Tells GQ Magazine “I’ve Worked Harder Than Anyone In Music Industry” [More Photos]

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Despite recent reports stating the full interview would be released on January 15th, GQ has gone again and release the interview to the media along with more photos from her spread.

During a sit down with the magazine, Beyonce talks working harder than anyone in the music industry and being free since she turned 30 years, her music career, family and more.

Check out the pics and highlights below:

On working harder than anyone in the music industry to be where she is now:

“I worked so hard during my childhood to meet this goal: By the time I was 30 years old, I could do what I want,” she says. “I’ve reached that. I feel very fortunate to be in that position. But I’ve sacrificed a lot of things, and I’ve worked harder than probably anyone I know, at least in the music industry. So I just have to remind myself that I deserve it.”

On comparing her career to a professional athlete:

“One of the reasons I connect to the Super Bowl is that I approach my shows like an athlete,” she says now. “You know how they sit down and watch whoever they’re going to play and study themselves? That’s how I treat this. I watch my performances, and I wish I could just enjoy them, but I see the light that was late. I see, ‘Oh God, that hair did not work.’ Or ‘I should never do that again.’ I try to perfect myself. I want to grow, and I’m always eager for new information.”

On performing on stage gives her life and her inner goes silent:

“I love my job, but it’s more than that: I need it,” she says. “Because before I gave birth, it was the only time in my life, all throughout my life, that I was lost.” She means this in a good way: When her brain turns off, it is, frankly, a relief. After drilling herself, repeating every move so many times, locking them in, she can then afford not to think. “It’s like a blackout. When I’m onstage, I don’t know what the crap happens. I am gone.”


On her sister Solange being a celebrity in her own way and working hard to get where she is:

“I have very, very early-on memories of her rehearsing on her own in her room. I specifically remember her taking a line out of a song or a routine and just doing it over and over and over again until it was perfect and it was strong. At age 10, when everybody else was ready to say, ‘Okay, I’m tired, let’s take a break,’ she wanted to continue—to ace it and overcome it.”

Solange recalls how Beyonce protecting her when she was younger:

“I can’t tell you how many times in junior high school, how many boys and girls can say Beyoncé came and threatened to put some hands on them if they bothered me,” Solange says with a laugh. Beyoncé says she harnessed that same temper to bolster her nerve and fuel her work. “I used to like when people made me mad,” she says in the HBO documentary, remembering her suburban Texas childhood, which was shaped (some would say cut short) by her determination to be a star. “I’m like, ‘Please piss me off before the performance.’ I used to use everything.” As Jay-Z rapped of Beyoncé at the beginning of her 2006 hit “Déjà Vu,” “She about to steam. Stand back.”


On her opinion about men and women being different and financially independent:

“You know, equality is a myth, and for some reason, everyone accepts the fact that women don’t make as much money as men do. I don’t understand that. Why do we have to take a backseat?” she says in her film, which begins with her 2011 decision to sever her business relationship with her father. “I truly believe that women should be financially independent from their men. And let’s face it, money gives men the power to run the show. It gives men the power to define value. They define what’s sexy. And men define what’s feminine. It’s ridiculous.”

She then added:

“You know, when I was writing the Destiny’s Child songs, it was a big thing to be that young and taking control. And the label at the time didn’t know that we were going to be that successful, so they gave us all control. And I got used to it. It is my goal in life to be that example. And I think it will, hopefully, trickle down, and more artists will see that. Because it only makes sense. It’s only fair.”

And on being comfortable on her throne:

“I now know that, yes, I am powerful,” she says. “I’m more powerful than my mind can even digest and understand.”

You can check out the full story here

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Kelly Williams is the co-Founder of GWL Magazine Network. She eats, breathes, and sleeps pop culture news and celebrity gossip! Her forte is celebrity news, reality tv recap and music news. Be sure to Follow us on Twitter and Facebook: @GWLmag, @Gossipwelove.